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Adams Morgan

The history of Adams Morgan lies in its name. Prior to 1956, the area was typically referred to as 18th and Columbia, but when the area began to suffer from "urban decay" the Adams-Morgan Neighborhood Conference was formed to promote urban renewal and to improve the neighborhood. The group’s name originated from two segregated elementary schools in the area: Thomas P. Morgan Elementary School and John Quincy Adams Elementary School. The name Adams-Morgan has remained ever since, although The Washington Post removed the hyphen in 2001, explaining that the area’s rising home values made it “profitable to sell off the hyphen."

Adams Morgan’s past is also known for housing the first Toys ‘R’ Us and the homes of former Presidents Kennedy, Eisenhower and Taft. The Adams Morgan Heritage Trail is a guided walking tour that will take you to each of these locations, in addition to other local historic attractions.

Quality of Life:

Adams Morgan is full of life, culture and history. Locals recognize the 18th Street Corridor for its nightlife, but don’t be fooled into thinking that the streets aren’t lively during the day. The neighborhood is known for its diversity, which is represented in the variety of cuisines and shops that line the streets. The warmer months attract D.C. residents from throughout the city for street festivals, farmers markets and other outdoor venues that sell food, art and other unique finds.

Adams Morgan offers the benefits of city living with a warm neighborhood feel. The typical home in Adams Morgan is a 19th-20th century row house, filling the streets with recognizable character. Residents enjoy the close proximity of Woodley Park, the home of the National Zoo, and Columbia Heights, which offers additional restaurants and shops to explore, all within walking distance.

Getting Around:

Adams Morgan has transportation options for everyone. The closest metro is Woodley Park Zoo/Adams Morgan, which is a quick walk across the Calvert St. Bridge. There are also several bus lines that can bring you around the city, including the $1 Circulator. If driving is more your speed, you are right down the road from Rock Creek Parkway.

Ronald Reagan National Airport < 10 miles

Washington Dulles International Airport < 30 miles

Baltimore Washington International Airport < 35 miles

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Alexandria City

Welcome to the city of Alexandria, a city that truly understands the slogan, “Virginia is for Lovers.” Voted the most romantic city in the U.S. for the year 2016, Alexandria is a city where both the past and present come alive. Alexandria has something for everyone, whether you’re a historian tracing George Washington’s footsteps or crafting your own path down the cobblestones of historic Old Town to indulge in the booming culinary scene and local boutiques.

Lying just south of Washington D.C., on the western side of the Potomac, Alexandria is a city perfect for those seeking to find a balance between urban and suburban lifestyles.  Approximately 7 miles outside of D.C, Alexandria consists of a vast array of unique neighborhoods, historic buildings, private and public schools, and local and government owned businesses.  

For those outdoor enthusiasts, Alexandria has a distributed park system that includes 70 major parks and 30 recreation centers, of which Chinquapin is one of the largest, offering facilities for swimming, tennis, racquetball, and other sports.  Looking for a jogging path or a place to ride your bike?  Look no further that the Mount Vernon Trail! Running through Old Town near the Potomac River to Roosevelt Island in Washington, D.C., this trail is not only great for you, but also for our four-legged friends! Is it a hot summer day and in need of some family fun?  Take a trip to Cameron Run Regional Park where you will find a wave pool, waterslides, miniature golf and batting cages. Family or friends flying into town for the weekend?  With Reagan National Airport only minutes away, have your guests take the metro to the King Street Station where you and your guests can take the free Trolley down King Street to enjoy dinner and drinks on the waterfront!

If you are looking for a city that offers that small town charm with big-city amenities, then look no further than the City of Alexandria.  Welcome home.

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Anacostia

The area known as Anacostia is often confused with the entire area touching the Anacostia River. In reality, it is much smaller than that. Anacostia is located in the 8th Ward and bordered by the Anacostia and Potomac rivers on the west, Southern Avenue on the east and Good Hope and Naylor roads to the north.

Anacostia’s history travels back to the early 17th Century when Captain John Smith arrived at the area and stumbled upon Nacotchtanke, the Native American Trading Village. The people of the area, the Nacotchtanks, were fisherman and farmers that occupied the land bordering the Anacostia River. After this point, Europeans were encouraged to migrate here for the fertile land.

In the 19th Century, famous faces like Frederick Douglas called Anacostia home. Douglas was known for buying the “Cedar Hill” estate in 1877 where he lived until he died; it is now a tourist destination.

Anacostia was designed with business and trade in mind, due to its proximity to the river. Up until the 1950’s there were still areas of Anacostia that were segregated, but in 1954 the Uniontown area, now the Historic District, was incorporated as part of Anacostia with the intention to be a home for the Navy Yard workers. This shift turned Anacostia into one of D.C.’s first suburbs.

Quality of Life:

Amongst the 71,000 residents in the greater Anacostia area, there is a sense of community. Many residents are proud to have lived in Anacostia for their entire lives. The streets look much like they did 50 years ago with frame row houses and apartments that are mostly Italianate and Cottage style. There are commercial areas around Good Hope Road and Martin Luther King, Jr. Avenue.

Anacostia is close to National's Stadium, which is just two metro stops away on the Green line. In addition to National’s Stadium a $10 billion restoration and revitalization project is planned for the waterfront.

Getting Around:

Anacostia is served by its own metro stop on the Green line. It’s only three stops away from the main hub station, L’Enfant Plaza, which connects to the Yellow, Green, Blue and Orange lines.

Ronald Reagan National Airport < 10 miles

Washington Dulles International Airport < 30 miles

Baltimore Washington International Airport < 35 mile

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Anne Arundel County

Anne Arundel County is south of Baltimore and lies adjacent to Howard County and Prince Georges County.

Anne Arundel County is home to Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport (BWI), which is an east coast hub for Southwest Airlines. Anne Arundel County also features several stops along the MARC commuter rail line.

The county’s close proximity to Annapolis, Baltimore and Washington D.C. provide a variety of dining, shopping and entertainment options. Residents take advantage of the 533 miles of Chesapeake Bay shoreline for a number of recreational activities.

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Arlington County

Welcome, to Arlington County! Located directly across the Potomac River from Washington, D.C., Arlington’s history is rich with detail.  Founded in 1801 as Alexandria County, Arlington was included in the original plans of the District of Columbia. In 1847, amidst growing unrest between northern and southern states, Alexandria County was ceded back to Virginia and Arlington County was formed. The county of Arlington has played home to several prominent figures in American history. George Mason is known to have owned land here. Robert E. Lee also resided in Arlington County.

Arlington is a charming locale shaped by Virginia hills and meandering streams. It is a seamless blend of urban and suburban development. In Arlington’s metro corridor, one will find luxury high-rises, condominiums and townhomes. These areas recede to more suburban areas, which feature single-family residences, townhomes and garden apartments. From glens to dales, it is easy to lose yourself in the expansive environment of Arlington County.

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AU Park/Tenleytown

Tenleytown dates back to the 1700s and is the second oldest settlement in the D.C. area, next to Georgetown. It was originally the last outpost for farmers delivering their wares from Frederick, MD to Georgetown. Tenleytown is also home to Fort Reno, which is highest point in the city at over 400 feet.

Prior to acquiring its current name, the area was referred to as Tennally’s Town after John Tennally, who owned a popular watering hole on what is now the corner of River Road and Wisconsin Avenue.

The growth of Tenleytown did not begin until the late 1800s when the D.C. streetcar line connected Tenleytown to the Downtown D.C. area. The 18th century area, “Old Tenleytown” encompassed what is now broken down into three separate neighborhoods: Tenleytown, American University Park and Friendship Heights.

Quality of Life:

Tenleytown is a comfortable, down-to-earth neighborhood that is a short distance from the downtown area. The community is easily walkable and a nearby Red line metro stop services residents and American University students.

Notable developments in the community include the completion of the Tenleytown Library, a modern building close to the AU Park/Tenleytown Metro station. The intersection of River Road and Wisconsin features a Whole Foods, A Best Buy, an Ace Hardware store and a variety of different restaurants. Tenleytown residents also enjoy the convenience of Fort Reno, which offers great sledding in the winter, a perfect picnic spot in the spring and fall and free concerts in the summer.

Getting Around:

The Tenleytown-American University Red line Metro stop off of Wisconsin Avenue is located in the center of town. Buses also frequent the area offering transportation toward Georgetown or Friendship Heights.

 

Ronald Reagan National Airport < 10 miles

Washington Dulles International Airport < 30 miles

Baltimore Washington International Airport < 35 mile

 

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Bloomingdale

Bloomingdale is in Northwest DC, just north of the Capitol, alongside Ledroit Park. The Bloomingdale area was not part of Pierre L’Enfant’s original city plan and was a rural area of large estates and orchards until the late 19th century. A flour mill was built at the corner of 3rd and Florida Avenue in the 1890s and train yards were soon to follow. Development continued with new transportation routes and paved roads at the turn of the century, making way for new urban residences. 

Quality of Life:

Bloomingdale continues to thrive as a small residential community. Like Ledroit Park, community has a wonderful selection of historic and well-appointed row houses. The neighborhood is quiet, accessible and close to many of DC’s monuments and universities, as well as commercial services, restaurants and grocery stores.

Getting Around:

Rhode Island Avenue and Florida Avenue cut across the Bloomingdale community. 2nd Street and North Capitol Street mark the west and east boundaries respectively. Like those in Ledroit Park, Bloomingdale residents are a short walk to either the New York Avenue Metro or Shaw Metro stations, as well as other Metro services.

 

Ronald Reagan National Airport < 10 miles

Washington Dulles International Airport < 30 miles

Baltimore Washington International Airport < 35 miles

 

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Bowie

Bowie is located in northeast Prince George’s County between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland. Named for Governor Oden Bowie in 1874, and built on eighteen square miles, the motto, “Growth, Unity, and Progress” is seen every day by residents. Due to its strategic location, railroad transportation is a significant part of Bowie’s past, present, and future. In 1872 the Baltimore and Potomac Railroad established a hub in Bowie to Washington, D.C. Today that railroad link is a part of Amtrak’s busy Northeast Corridor.

Quality of Life:

Bowie residents are proud of the various recreational and cultural opportunities in their community. Bowiefest is a one day June celebration where residents are introduced to the Best of Bowie! Bowie’s International Festival held in October is a time for the community to celebrate. Bowie residents can hike the Washington, Baltimore and Annapolis trail, find plenty of activities available at Genealogical Society Library, local public libraries, and the community recreational centers. Bowie has public parks for golfing, ice skating, boat rentals, its own Bowie Skate Park, tennis, soccer fields and miles of bike trails. The Bowie Playhouse Theatre hosts four theatre companies that provide a variety of live entertainment, as well as the Bowie Railroad Museum. See future baseball stars at a Bowie Baysox AA minor league game at Bowie Stadium! Visit the iconic Belair Mansion, home to Provincial Governor Samuel Ogle, on the National Register of Historic Places and open to the public with free admission.

Getting Around:

Going to Washington, D.C. the Metrobus service connects commuters to the New Carrollton Metrorail station on the Orange line with various stops in Bowie and from the Park and Ride lot near Town Center Mall. New Carrollton is a central hub to Amtrak, Greyhound and Metrobus routes.

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Brentwood

The Brentwood community in the northeast quadrant of Washington takes its name from Brentwood Mansion, built in 1817 by the first mayor of Washington City, Robert Brent. The greater Brentwood area is also home to Gallaudet University, the nation’s leading undergraduate and graduate school for the hearing impaired. The university was created by an act of Congress in 1864 and its charter was signed by President Abraham Lincoln. A portion of the Gallaudet campus is built on the site of the old Brentwood Mansion.  The National Arboretum is a 400+ acre oasis near Brentwood and is dedicated to botanical research, and is operated by the United States Department of Agriculture.

Quality of Life:

Much of the housing stock in Brentwood is comprised of townhouses, duplexes and row houses that were constructed in the mid-20th Century.  And while it wouldn’t be accurate to call Brentwood a “college town,” nearby universities are an important part of community life.

Getting Around:

Brentwood enjoys ready access to the Rhode Island, New York Avenue and Minnesota Avenue metro stops and is served by major roads including Benning Road, New York Avenue and the Anacostia Freeway.  Bus service through the area is excellent.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Brightwood/16th Street Heights

Brightwood is bounded by Aspen Street, Rock Creek Park, Georgia Avenue and Kennedy Street. The community is home to what is often considered to be the city’s most important Civil War site. In July 1864, 20,000 Confederate soldiers attacked Fort Stevens, which sat on what is today Brightwood.  

Quality of Life:

Brightwood is a small, quiet residential area situated off of Georgia Avenue. Rock Creek Park offers a golf course, tennis courts, horse center and amphitheater. In addition to the park’s resources, Brightwood also has two recreational centers: Fort Stevens Recreation Center and Emery Recreation Center.

Brightwood sets the stage for several festivals and community days, including the D.C. Caribbean Carnival Parade, Brightwood Day and Fort Stevens Day. Fort Stevens Day includes a full Civil War re-enactment. The Brightwood Heritage Trail guides visitors around the community’s historic grounds.

Getting Around:

The Takoma Park Metro station is walkable from the northern parts of the community. The neighborhood has walkable access to the Fort Totten Metro. In addition to the Metro rail, several bus routes also serve Brightwood.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Brookland/Catholic University

Like many other DC neighborhoods, Brookland’s growth was spurred by the arrival of a major transportation line. In this case the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad ran its Western Branch Line through Brookland in the 1870s. The main residence at the time was the Brooks Mansion, which was home to Colonel Jeheil Brooks and from which the community takes its name. Washington’s streetcars eventually expanded to Brookland, helping to develop a middle class suburb just beyond the Catholic University of America Campus and Brooks Mansion.

Quality of Life:

Brookland real estate is primarily residential. It offers a quiet, welcoming environment that is enjoyed by all. Old row houses and bungalows stand as a testament to an older era. Brookland’s agrarian past lives on in the community’s popular gardening culture, which is supported by the Franciscan Monastery’s herb and plant sale.

Getting Around:

The Red Line Metro station Brookland-CUA services the Brookland neighborhood. Metro bus service is a dependable option as well.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Bryce

Bryce Resort is located about two hours west of the DC metropolitan area, next to the George Washington National Forest in Shenandoah County. It rests in a small valley within the greater Shenandoah Valley, the “Valley of the Daughter of the Stars,” nestled against the West Virginia border in the Appalachian Mountain range. The elevation of the area varies from 1,263 feet to 1,760 feet. The area around Bryce Resort is typically ten degrees cooler and ten percent less humid than the DC area, with lilting breezes almost every day.

Bryce Resort has been offering outdoor activities to visitors since 1905. Traditionally speaking, it is a place where people sought respite from heat, humidity and busy professional lives. This is a trend that has continued well into the 21st century.

Quality of Life:

Today’s activities include golf, skiing, tennis, swimming, boating, fishing, hiking, hunting, flying, and more recently, zip-line, bungee jumping, rock climbing and mini golf. Bryce is renowned for its sports clinics for people of all ages. Indoor activities include fine and casual dining, music, cards, and the meetings of various clubs and charitable organizations. The core area of Bryce Resort includes a lodge, a sports complex, a ski building, and a members lounge and locker room.

Fifty-two miles of private roads surround homes on the slopes, many of them with mountain views. There are two lakes, the largest of which, Lake Laura, has a beach area with lounge chairs, a concession stand, pedal boats, pontoons, and kayaks available for use. The water is soft and children grow up with fond memories of diving off pontoons or canoeing during the long, lazy days of summer. Fishing is allowed and permits are available at the community store. Boating is permitted, but no gasoline engines. Hunting is possible in the George Washington National Forest in season with a permit. Flying is done from the Sky Bryce Airport (VG-18) and it is an easy walk from the ramp to the Lodge and all activities. There is also an all-volunteer public library with Wi-Fi at the airport.

The Sky Bryce Homeowners Association provides road maintenance and snow removal, refuse pickup, and a roving security patrol. Homeowners enjoy underground utilities, public water and sewer service, high-speed Internet, and cable TV. In general, there are fewer outages in Bryce than in the DC metro area because of the underground utilities and the excellence of the utilities providers.

Homeowners in Bryce typically do not have lawns, since most of them have lawns at their principal residences, so the woods are deep and cool, and there is ample separation between homes for privacy. The area attracts people from all professions – some come just to relax and stay fit, others enjoy telecommuting from their Bryce home.

Whether you seek the peace of a natural setting in the Shenandoah or a lively day of sports and activities, Bryce Resort has something to offer all of your family and friends.

Getting Around:

I-66 W, Route 81 South

Helpful websites:

www.BryceResort.com
www.SkyBryce.org

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Calvert County

Calvert County is located in Southern Maryland. It is bordered by the Chesapeake Bay and the Patuxent River. Calvert County is part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area.

Calvert County is home to roughly 87,000 people. There are two incorporated towns – North Beach and Chesapeake Beach – and several town centers.

Calvert County is known for Calvert County Cliffs State Park. The cliffs – for which the park takes its name (obviously), feature prehistoric fossils and sharks teeth. There is ample opportunity for hiking, picnicking, camping and hunting. The Calvert County Department of Parks and Recreation also provide numerous activities and programs for the entire community.

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Capitol Heights

The Town of Capitol Heights was the idea of Otway B. Zantzinger, who saw the possibilities of bringing new residents to the outskirts of the District in 1904. Advertising beautiful lots with generous buyer financing and a future electric railway stop with views of Washington, D.C., his 400-acre vision is today known as Capitol Heights. Just over the Washington, D.C. boundary with Seat Pleasant to the north, Walker Mill to the east, District Heights/Suitland to the south and the Washington, D.C. to the west, it covers an area of 0.80 square miles.

Quality of Life:

The Capital Heights Festival kicks off summer fun celebrating food, music, crafts, bands, lots of dancing plus children’s entertainment. Just a few miles north in Landover, Washington Redskins fans can see their favorite team play at FedExField. Richie Station Marketplace continues to develop new retail stores to serve Capitol Heights and the surrounding communities. The new Hampton Park currently in development will help revitalize the Central Avenue Corridor. The future and much anticipated University of Maryland Capital Region Medical Center in Largo, just a few metro stops away, is under construction for completion in 2020.

Getting Around:

The Town is strategically located less than a mile from Washington, D.C. The Capitol Heights Metro station is on both the Blue and Silver lines. With the Town of Capitol Heights conveniently located to both the District and Maryland, commuters have good access to I-295 and I-495 as well. Joint Base Andrews is located right off 95/495, home to Air Force, Army, Navy and Marine commands. The Suitland Federal Center is also nearby for commuters.

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Capitol Hill

Before the hot air of bureaucracy settled over Capitol Hill in 1791, the area was rural farmland better known as Jenkins Hill. While Capitol Hill may not represent the “true center” of the District, it has been the center of the American political experience since 1791, when Pierre L’Enfant chose it as the site for the nation’s “Congress House.”

Capitol Hill is situated in both the NE and SE quadrants. It is one of the oldest residential communities in D.C. From its inception, the area surrounding the U.S. Capitol was a desirable location for Congressman and Senators to set up temporary residence. It is home to a number of American landmarks, including the Supreme Court and the Library of Congress, and luminaries like John Phillip Sousa, Frederick Douglass and J. Edgar Hoover. The Capitol Hill Historic District is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Quality of Life:

Capitol Hill is the largest residential historic district in the District. The street plan remains a testament to L’Enfant’s vision; wide avenues feature lines of well-maintained row houses reflecting a range of different styles, from stately, Federal townhomes to smaller frame residences.

While many of the Hill’s residents still seek temporary living accommodations, there are many who make Capitol Hill their permanent “headquarters.” Those who stake a claim have unprecedented access to an eclectic mix of contemporary restaurants and boutiques. The National Mall and the Smithsonian Museums are only a short walk away. Eastern Market, which features fresh food, craft stands and other artisanal booths, attracts a considerable crowd on the weekends, especially during the spring and summer months.

Getting Around:

Democracy rules; Capitol Hill is a pedestrian-friendly community open to all. There are two metro stops on the Blue and Orange lines at Capitol South and Eastern Market. Like most D.C. neighborhoods, reliable buses ferry residents between different parts of the city.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Charles County

Charles County is located in South Central Maryland and is part of the Washington Metropolitan Area. It is adjacent to Prince William County (just across the Potomac), Calvert County, Fairfax County and Prince George’s County.

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Chevy Chase

To many residents of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, Chevy Chase is almost synonymous with Maryland. But this definition only describes one half of a larger community.

Chevy Chase, D.C. was developed in conjunction with Chevy Chase, M.D. Both were part of the vision shared by Senator Francis Newlands and William Stewart, who foresaw the future value of land northwest of the nation’s Capitol. The two men bought thousands of acres of land along modern day Connecticut Avenue, and transferred the rights to their Chevy Chase Land Company.

The development of Chevy Chase, D.C. mirrored the growth of metropolitan communities in Arlington and Alexandria in the late 1800s. From farmland to suburb, the electric streetcar bolstered and encouraged the evolution of Chevy Chase, D.C. and beyond. Today, the community strikes a balance between capitol delights and suburban serenity, reaffirming the original intentions of its planners.

Quality of Life:

Housing stock reflects the community’s progressive trend, from pasture to parceled lots. Sears homes, colonials, capes and contemporary styles are all represented here. There are apartments and condominiums as well.

Rock Creek Park provides plenty for residents seeking an outdoor fix. The Chevy Chase Recreation Center features a Little League baseball field, basketball courts and playground. There are numerous restaurants and boutique eateries throughout the area. 

Getting Around

There is no metro line that runs directly through Chevy Chase, D.C. however, there are several buses including: M4, L1, L2, L4 E2, E3, E4 and E6 that run up and down Connecticut Avenue. The metro is also accessible on foot or car at either Tenleytown—AU or Van Ness—UDC stations. These stops are on the Red line. 

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Clarke County

Clarke County, VA

Clarke County, VA is located northwest of Middleburg, VA. Like its neighboring counties, Clarke County, VA is a rural environment. Clarke County, VA also features of number of historic homes and estates. Residents of Clarke County have access to a number of recreational outlets – one can take a hike on Appalachian Trail or enjoy a lazy on the Shenandoah River. Clarke County is also home to several golf courses and is a top cycling destination.

Quality of Life:

Clarke County, VA offers the rural beauty, history, and charm of Virginia's Blue Ridge Mountains and the Shenandoah Valley.  One can go cycling on Clarke County’s scenic roads, canoe and fish on the Shenandoah River, go horseback riding, take a balloon ride, play golf, or hike the Appalachian Trail. The hustle and bustle of the built-up areas to the east melts away as you cross in to the Blue Ridge Mountains and Shenandoah Valley.  Clarke County, VA offers a truly unique experience.

Clarke County not only offers remarkable outdoor adventures, but also countless historic attractions. Historic farms, mills, estates, chapels, museums and monasteries are all at your fingertips in Clarke County, VA.

Clarke County provides a wide variety of restaurants that are sure to please everyone. From country cooking to fine dining and ethnic cuisine to fast food, Clarke County is sure to meet your needs. Three wineries offer excellent choices of wine varieties, but also very scenic venues where you can sample these excellent wines.

Getting Around:

Clarke County offers the Shenandoah Valley Commuter Bus Service, which allows commuters from the Northern Shenandoah Valley region commute to Northern Virginia and the Washington, D.C. area. Easily accessible, west to east U.S Route 50 will take you directly into Washington, D.C as well as State Route 7 taking you in to downtown Alexandria. 

Airports:

Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport   < 30 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport  < 55 miles

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Cleveland Park

The history of Cleveland Park dates back to a land patent issued by Lord Baltimore in 1713 to Thomas Addison and James Stoddert. The original land grant stretched from Cleveland Park to Spring Valley.

In the 1740s the entire area was home to General Uriah Forest's 1000-acre farm. Wealthy Washingtonian’s caught wind of the area in the 1800s and used it as a place to build their summer homes. With no air conditioners, Cleveland Park provided those who could afford it a breezy relief from the hot D.C. summers.

With the development of streetcars, Cleveland Park was transformed from summer estates to suburban enclave. In 1888, Grover Cleveland - the community’s namesake – sold his “Oak View” estate, paving the way for new developments and growth. A couple of these original estates remain in Cleveland Park today, including the Tregaron Estate and the Twin Oaks Estate.

Quality of Life:

The architectural theme of Cleveland Park reflects an eclectic blend of Queen Anne, Mission Revival and Georgian Revival styles. Elegant single-family detached homes and townhomes lend an air of prestige to a community that has housed many prominent Americans. While the summer estates of the 19th century may have been developed, Cleveland Park continues to offer solitude and respite for those looking to leave their work downtown. Cleveland Park is, in essence, a small town in a big city.

Cleveland Park residents are a short walk to both the National Zoo and the National Cathedral. The Uptown Theater, built in 1936, stands as a modern relic of the Art Deco style. There are many restaurants that cater to a wide variety of tastes. Nearby Rock Creek Park hosts plenty of trails suited for running and biking.

Getting Around:

The Red line metro stop at Cleveland Park is the most direct way to get to the center of the community and downtown D.C. The station exits on Connecticut Avenue, where visitors can walk south to the National Zoo. Cleveland Park is also served by several bus stops that run along both Connecticut and Wisconsin Avenue. Woodley Park and Van Ness are also nearby.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Colonial Village

The community of Colonial Village occupies the northernmost point of the District of Columbia. It is bound by 16th Street, Holly Street and Bach Drive. Settlement of this area began in the 1600s. Modern day Colonial Village was originally included on some of the first maps of Virginia. This changed in 1629 when King Charles I of England granted the land rights to the first Lord of Baltimore. Subsequently, the land was absorbed into the colony of Maryland. It wasn’t until 1800 that Colonial Village was included in the northwest quadrant of D.C.

While the community’s name is tied to America’s colonial past, the only colonial homes to be found here are replicas. The first house in Colonial Village was completed in 1931.

Quality of Life:

Despite its size, Colonial Village is a dynamic, tight-knit community. Winding hills and thickets of mature trees slope into Rock Creek Park, the perfect place to run, jog, bike or walk the dog. Colonial Village offers a quiet, residential experience.

Getting Around:

The closest metro to Colonial Village is Silver Spring station on the Red line, which is accessible to Colonial Village residents by car or bike.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Columbia Heights

Columbia Heights is located in the northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C. Prior to its development, Columbia Heights was mostly farmland.

Columbia Heights was the original home to Columbian College, which is better known today as George Washington University. The community experienced suburban growth after the Civil War, when horse-drawn streetcars began ferrying residents to and from downtown D.C.  During the early 1900s, Columbia Heights featured expansive urban estates and rows of stately town homes.

Quality of Life:

Columbia Heights is one of the most architecturally diverse neighborhoods in the city. The architectural legacy is carried on by historic row houses mixed with high-rise condominiums and apartments. New commercial developments and the arrival of a metro rail station have reinvigorated the community and added to its charm.

Residents are walking distance from Meridian Hill Park and the newly established Columbia Heights Heritage Trail, a walking tour that guides visitors past historic sites in the neighborhood. D.C. USA is the most recent addition to Columbia Heights, with a Target, Best Buy, Bed Bath & Beyond and several new restaurants along the main stretch.

Getting Around:

Columbia Heights is easily accessible via public transportation. The Green and Yellow lines can be picked up at the Columbia Heights Metro at the corner of 14th and Irving Streets. Metrobus service, including the $1 Circulator Line, is also available. Main arteries are 14th Street and Columbia Road N.W.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Congress Heights

Congress Heights is an emerging residential area of increasing economic investment activity located in southeast Washington, D.C. Congress Heights has seen much commercial development along Martin Luther King Jr. Avenue and Malcolm X Avenues. Congress Heights borders the St. Elizabeth Hospital campus to the northeast on Alabama Avenue SE, South Capitol Street to the west, Atlantic Street to the south and Alabama Avenue to the east. St. Elizabeth Hospital’s mixed-use redevelopment project is also underway. This expansive undertaking will become a new community hospital, create vast commercial spaces, a widely anticipated sports and entertainment complex for D.C. basketball fans, plus a large selection of apartments and townhouses. In addition, by 2020, the Homeland Security Headquarters is scheduled to be part of a residential and retail complex. The Congress Heights Metro station will see new construction soon for a retail and residential apartment project with future plans to increase mixed-use development in the Alabama Avenue SE and 13 Street SE location.

Quality of Life:

In the midst of increasing long-term residential and commercial development of the area, the residents successfully maintain an inclusive sense of community in Congress Heights. Multigenerational residents include homeowners, renters, young people, professionals, and families, as well as longtime residents committed to supporting and strengthening their community during this time of economic transition. Local activities, fresh produce markets, community awareness and information via social media help keep residents informed in Congress Heights.

Getting Around:

Commuting to the Pentagon, Navy Yard and Capitol Hill from Congress Heights plus good access to National Harbor, I-295, and Virginia make this location popular with commuters. The future addition of the Homeland Security Headquarters and the plans for St. Elizabeth’s campus will affect all residents. The Congress Heights Metro station, below St. Elizabeth’s on the Green Line, will be transformed by new mixed-use construction. Metrobus and DC Circulator serve commuters as well.

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Crestwood

Crestwood is bounded by 16th Street NW, on the east, Colorado Avenue on the northwest and Rock Creek Park on the west and south. The history of Crestwood can be traced back to colonial land grants from the early 18th century. The land offered an enticing niche of resources: a creek that could power water wheels, a forest for game hunting and, later, recreation.

Originally surveyed as a single estate, Crestwood began its transformation into a residential neighbor in the early 1900s. The pace of development picked up during the years before and after World War II.

Quality of Life:

Crestwood is an attractive community of single-family residences located three miles from the White House. Residents enjoy easy access to downtown attractions as much as they do a quiet place to call home.

Rock Creek Park is an ideal outlet for those looking to bike, run, jog or walk. The neighboring communities of Mount Pleasant and Columbia Heights offer a wide selection of restaurants as well as access to the metro. An involved and proactive citizens association ensures the preservation of the community and organizes events for all to enjoy.

Getting Around:

Crestwood residents are roughly 15 minutes away from Silver Spring by car. No metro station in Crestwood however, residents can pick up the Green and Yellow lines at the Columbia Heights and Georgia Ave./Petworth stations.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Culpeper County

Culpeper County, VA

Culpeper County, VA is located northwest of Fredericksburg, VA and is considered to be part of the Greater Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area. It includes the town of Culpeper. Many of Culpeper’s residents commute to work in other locations in Northern Virginia and Washington, DC.

Quality of Life:

Culpeper County is an hour from Charlottesville, Washington, D.C. and Fredericksburg, and a short drive to Skyline Drive and the Shenandoah National Park. Culpeper is surrounded by the Blue Ridge Mountains and hills, which offer hiking, cycling, hunting, fishing, canoeing and kayaking. Along with the beautiful family parks and waterways Culpeper County has nationally ranked equestrian facilities.

Culpeper County offers various shopping opportunities. From antique/consignment shops to bookstores, country stores to florists and art galleries to spa services, Culpeper has your needs met. No matter what season it is Culpeper County holds events, rain or shine all year round.

Culpeper County is known as one of the hottest dining destinations in Virginia. From smoked barbeque to hand cut sushi, there are numerous restaurants to select from. Along with the abundance of eateries there is a huge farm-to-table movement in Culpeper. All the food is prepared fresh from the Farmers Markets, then put on the table to enjoy. Not only is Culpeper home to several award-wining wineries, also Culpeper is home to the only legal Moonshine distillery in Virginia.

Getting Around:

Running north and south through the town of Culpeper, the Culpeper Trolley costs $.50 to serve you. Foothills Express takes you through Culpeper, Madison and Charlottesville every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday. Costing you $3 one-way or $5 round-trip. The Tri-County Connecter takes you through Orange County, Culpeper, Brandy Station, Remington, Bealton, Opal and Warrenton. Every day three round trips are available with a one-way fare of $1. From north to south I-66 is easy to access, which can lead you to I-81. Route 3 West will take you to I-95 taking you in to Richmond, VA.

Airports:

Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 60 miles
Richmond International Airport:  < 90 miles

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DuPont Circle

DuPont Circle lies at the intersection of Connecticut Avenue, Massachusetts Avenue, New Hampshire Avenue, P Street and 19th Street. DuPont Circle was located in the “Old City” portion of Pierre Charles L’Enfant’s plan, but most of the physical development did not occur until after the Civil War. Improvements of the area started in the 1870s with the intentions of creating a posh region and residential neighborhood. 

The circle, originally called Pacific Circle, was renamed in 1882 after a statue of Samuel Francis DuPont was placed in the middle of the traffic circle. The DuPont statue remained in the circle until it was moved to Wilmington, DE in 1920 and was replaced by a double-tiered fountain created by the architects of the Lincoln Memorial.

Quality of Life:

Behind the main traffic circle you will find row houses built in the Queen Anne and Richardsonian Romanesque revival style on beautiful tree-lined streets. There are countless restaurants, shops, art galleries and museums that are nestled between the headquarters of non-profit and other advocacy groups.

DuPont Circle is perhaps most famously known for “Embassy Row,” where you will find the most embassies in one area along Massachusetts Avenue. The embassies open up their doors every Halloween for children for the annual embassy trick-or-treating event.

Warm weather brings people from all over the city to DuPont Circle. People picnic in the circle or wander the streets to window shop and admire the architecture. One of the more unique restaurants in DuPont Circle is Kramerbooks & Afterwords, which is D.C.’s first combination bookstore and café.

DuPont Circle is one of the most sought after places to live in the city. It is a center for weekend nightlife  and is one metro stop from Woodley Park/Adams Morgan and Farragut North.

Getting Around:

DuPont Circle is the home to its own Metro station with Red line service. Metro buses frequent this corridor. Driving isn’t difficult however parking may be a little sparse.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Eckington

Eckington, one of D.C.’s oldest neighborhoods, is named for an 18th-century country estate. Located north of D.C.’s original boundary, Florida Avenue, and east of North Capitol Street, Eckington was originally a residential subdivision created in 1887 by Col. George Truesdell, a successful real estate entrepreneur. Mr. Truesdell mapped his neighborhood streets, installed electrical lighting and provided the first infrastructure including the first electric streetcar line in Washington, D.C. known as the Eckington and Soldiers Home Railway. Eckington features a mix of residential and industrial buildings. The government annexed land in Eckington for the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad freight yards and to the present day, Eckington boasts a unique character combining a mix of industrial and residential buildings.

Quality of Life:

Eckington is known to be a tight-knit community that succeeds in preserving the small town feel in the midst of busy Washington, D.C. Small and large retail businesses thrive here and there is a mix of iconic row houses and small industries throughout Eckington. Being close to downtown and with good walkability and public transportation, plus colorful row houses and mature trees to welcome you, Eckington may have what you are looking for in a community. Also, check out nearby Crispus Attucks Park where nearby communities enjoy the farmer’s market and other special events throughout the year.

Getting Around:

Eckington shares borders with Rhode Island Avenue to the north, the Metropolitan Branch Trail to the east, Florida Avenue to the south and North Capitol Street to the west. Eckington is less than one mile southeast of Howard University and one mile north of the United States Capitol. Metro’s Rhode Island Avenue and NoMa-Gallaudet stations are just outside the neighborhood’s borders.

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Fairfax County

In the years since its creation in 1742, Fairfax County has been transformed from farmland to bedroom community to the economic engine of Virginia.  Fairfax County was home to George Washington, the first President, and George Mason, the Father of the Bill of Rights.

The growth of the federal government following World War II spurred Fairfax County’s growth. Today, it is home to more than 1,000,000 residents, making it by far the most populous County in Virginia and in the Washington, DC region.  More Fortune 500 companies make their headquarters in Fairfax County than anywhere else in the region, and the Tysons Corner area has more office space than the downtown areas of most major cities.  Much of the nation’s Internet traffic flows through Fairfax, and it also home to the Central Intelligence Agency and the Department of Homeland Security.

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Falls Church City

Falls Church City, VA

If you are looking for a city with a strong sense of community that you can call home, then look no further and welcome to the City of Falls Church! Taking its name from “The Falls Church”, an 18th-century Anglican Parish, the City of Falls Church is an independent city nestled between Fairfax and Arlington County.  Consisting of a unique environment that almost seamlessly blends rural and suburban lifestyle, it’s not hard to see why it is frequently named one of CNN’s Top 100 Places to live in the U.S.
 
Located only six miles from the Nation’s Capital and inside the Beltway, the City of Falls Church offers a variety of neighborhoods featuring a wide selection of townhomes and single-family residences, a nationally ranked school system, and endless year round events.
 
Gaining Township status within Fairfax County in 1875, Falls Church served as a rural farming community throughout most of the 19th century.  Consisting of large land plantations that had been sub-divided into smaller farms comprising various crops; including wheat, corn, potatoes and fruit that were grown for area markets, the City of Falls Church remains true to its history by holding a year-round farmers market at the City Hall every Saturday.  Not only will you find an abundance of fruits and vegetables, you will also find a strong sense of community.  The Farmers Market is only one of many traditional community events that Falls Church City takes pride in.  Many other long-standing community wide events include Concerts in the Park, Sunset Cinema, Tinner Hill Blues Festival, Memorial Day Parade and Festival, Independence Day Celebration, and many more!
 
If you are looking to get out for some fresh air and want to explore the city, why not take a walking tour of the city’s historic sites and explore the city’s 6 marked stops along the Civil War Trail (Insert Map?). Not in the mood for a city tour? Then come and park yourself at one of the city’s 12 Parks.  Grab a picnic table and have your friends and family gather for a summer cookout and enjoy the many amenities offered from grill equipment to playgrounds and lighted basketball, volleyball, and tennis courts.  If it’s a night on the town you are looking for, head into Falls Church City for dinner on Broad Street and then make your way to the classic 1936 movie house, The State Theater, for a night of music and entertainment.  
 
The City of Falls Church not only offers a wide variety of events and entertainment, it also offers it’s own highly rated school system.  Of the now five schools serving under the city’s independent public school division, the Falls Church City Public Schools (FCCPS), there is one Preschool, two Elementary Schools, one Intermediate School and one High School.  The newest addition to Falls Church, the Jessie Thackrey Preschool, serves children 2 to 5 years old and also offers special needs programs.  The city’s two elementary schools, Mt. Daniel and Thomas Jefferson, have long been recognized as schools of excellence by the U.S. Department of Education and the Virginia Department of Education.  For those students in grades 5-7, Mary Ellen Henderson Middle School, open in 2005 and recognized as a school of excellence, offers a progressive, enriching, and differentiated curriculum in an effort to help guide future academic and career goals.  As Virginia’s first school to offer the challenging International Baccalaureate (IB) program, George Mason High School gives students the opportunity to earn college credit while still in high school.  The school’s reputation is widely known and consistently cited in national publications for above average state and national standardized test scores.

Getting Around:

Wondering how to get your friends and family to Falls Church? Broad Street bisects the community, linking Falls Church to Tyson’s Corner in the west and Arlington and Alexandria to the east.  There are two metro stops at East and West Falls Church, which run on the Orange Line, numerous bus routes, and Falls Church is also easily accessible by Routes 66 and 50.  For those friends and family visiting from the West Coast, not to worry! With two airports both less than 20 miles away, you have your choice of Ronald Reagan National Airport or Washington Dulles International Airport.
 
No matter which mode of transportation you choose, make sure it brings you home to the City of Falls Church!

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 15 miles.
Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 20 miles.
Baltimore Washington International Airport:  < 50 miles.

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Fauquier County

Fauquier County, VA

Fauquier County is part of the Washington DC Metropolitan Area. It is adjacent to Loudoun County, Clarke County, Prince William County, Culpeper County and Warren County. Fauquier County contains more than seven hundred sites, places, and areas of historic significance. Route 66 runs through the northern part of Fauquier County.

Quality of Life:

Fauquier County offers peacefulness away from the hustle and bustle of life’s hectic pace. It is located in the heart of Virginia’s wine and hunt country. Fauquier offers over 21 parks and recreational facilities, various golf clubs, equestrian clubs and training centers and The Flying Circus. The Flying Circus is every Sunday, May through October where pilots and parachute jumps perform daring stunts off airplanes.

Fauquier County has agricultural aspects like, pick-your-own berries/veggies, farm tours, Farmer’s Markets and corn mazes. Along with the enjoyable outdoor activities, Fauquier is home to many historical battlefield sites, museums, trails and tours and family research centers.

Getting Around:

I-81 is easily assessable taking you to I-81 north or south. U.S. Route 15 will take you north and south to New York or South Carolina. U.S. Route 17 and 29 are also very accessible from Fauquier County, VA.

Airports:

Culpeper County Airport:  < 22 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 40 miles
Flying T Farm Airport:  < 44 miles

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Foggy Bottom

Foggy Bottom is located west of Downtown, D.C. in the Northwest quadrant. It was the site of one of the earliest settlements, and is one of the oldest neighborhoods, in the District of Columbia.

Foggy Bottom was home to a number of breweries and other industrial plants in the late 1800s. It is said that the community received its name from the “fog” that was generated by the factories.

In modern contexts, the name “Foggy Bottom” is almost synonymous for the State Department, which has its headquarters here. Foggy Bottom also provides the backdrop to a number of other illustrious institutions such as the World Bank, Federal Reserve Board and the Watergate Building.  But everything here isn’t shrouded in controversy. George Washington University’s campus was relocated to Foggy Bottom from Columbia Heights in 1873. The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is also included on the map.

Quality of Life:

Residents who choose to live in Foggy Bottom are looking for a real “city” feeling. Most of the homes are luxury apartments and modern high-rises.

There are plenty of activities within walking distance, including the National Mall, great restaurants, summer street festivals and the Kennedy Center, which is home to the National Symphony Orchestra. The shops and restaurants of Georgetown are also convenient destinations.

Getting Around:

Foggy Bottom is located right outside the heart of downtown D.C. The Foggy Bottom metro stop, found right off Washington Circle, provides access to the Blue and Orange line trains. For those driving: I-66 is less than one mile away and it is easy to get on to the G.W. Parkway.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Forest Hills

Forest Hills is located in Northwest D.C. Like Chevy Chase to the north, the environment of Forest Hills is lush - tall, thick trees line arching streets that conform to the community’s rolling hills.

The story of Forest Hills is similar to that of other communities in Northwest. Forest Hills was initially home to Native Americans, later the site of Civil War encampments and eventually, a “neighborhood” of large farms and distinguished estates. In the late 19th and early 20th century, much of the land was sold to make way for suburban developments. 

It was the neighborhood of choice for several prominent Americans, including Presidents Truman and Johnson and FBI Direction J. Edgar Hoover. Forest Hills’ distinguished past lives on at the Hillwood Estate Museum and Gardens, which was the home of Marjorie Merriweather Post, heiress to the Post Cereal fortune.

Quality of Life:

Forest Hills is a sophisticated, neighborhood that features contemporary colonials and modern, single-family residences. There are several pockets of elegant townhomes as well as impressive apartment and condominiums. Rock Creek Park provides a scenic backdrop to suburban pursuits.

Residents have easy access to Connecticut Avenue; Chevy Chase lies to the north; Cleveland Park borders the community on the south. Numerous amenities can be found nearby including grocery and convenience stores, restaurants and metro services.

Getting Around:

Forest Hills is served by the Red line metro at the Van Ness-UDC metro stop. Metro bus service runs up and down Connecticut Avenue toward Maryland and downtown toward DuPont Circle. Driving is easy and most, if not all, residences have ample parking.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Fort Totten

The Fort Totten neighborhood in Northeast DC takes its name from a Civil War-era fort, one of a series of defenses built around the perimeter of the District after the First Battle of Bull Run in Virginia.  While off the beaten path and not a tourist attraction, the remains of the fort still exist.  Located to the north of Capitol Hill, land that long ago was farmland is now a primarily a residential community.  Fort Totten is also home to the Washington Hospital Center, the largest private not-for-profit hospital in DC, which has a world-wide reputation for its heart and trauma services.

Quality of Life:

Like much of the surrounding area, homes in the Fort Totten area tend to be row or townhomes built shortly after World War II.  The Metro stop in the community – not surprisingly named Fort Totten – is one of the few in Washington, DC that has not spurred significant development, but there are plans underway that could change the face of the neighborhood.

Getting Around:

North Capital Street runs along the west side of Fort Totten, offering easy access to Capitol Hill to the south and suburban Maryland to the north.  Buses provide great service through the area, and the Fort Totten Metro is the jumping off point for access to the entire metro system.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 9 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 30 miles

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Fort Washington

Fort Washington is named for its historic significance and strategic location on the Potomac River in an unincorporated area south of the District of Columbia. The original Fort Warburton was completed in 1809 but destroyed by the British during the War of 1812. Renamed Fort Washington when rebuilt in 1824, it was designed to protect the District of Columbia from future British attacks. During World War II the Fort served as an Army Officer Candidate School as well as the location for the 67th WAAC Detachment of women that supported the war effort. The Potomac River borders Fort Washington on the west, National Harbor to the north, Oxon Hill to the northeast and Accokeek to the south.

Quality of Life:

Residents enjoy outdoor, educational and environmental activities in Fort Washington due to their proximity to Piscataway Park. Interpreting and conserving the natural resources of Piscataway Park through numerous community programs benefits all residents. The National Colonial Farm uses plants to preserve our culture and health through research and education for the entire DC Metro region. Improve your golf handicap with the challenging and popular Henson Creek Golf course open to the public. Live harness racing fans can step back in time and visit Rosecroft Raceway.

Getting Around:

Maryland Route 210 off of 95/495 provides good access to Fort Washington for commuters. There is no Metro stop in Fort Washington. It is accessible through roads such as the Livingston Road and Old Forts Roads.

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Frederick County

Frederick County, VA

Frederick County, VA is located northwest of the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area. In fact, the northern most point of Virginia is located in Frederick County. Residents of Frederick County, VA have their choice of a wide range of housing options. There is plenty to do for those seeking recreational pursuits. Living in Frederick County puts you at home next to Shenandoah National Park. Everyone in Virginia loves the scenery down Skyline Drive.

Quality of Life:

Frederick County offers four seasons of adventure in the Shenandoah Valley. Offering outdoor recreation, farms and Farmers Markets, vineyards, valley wine trails, museums and a very charming downtown. Extravagant attractions of Frederick are the caverns and rock formations. Underground attractions Luray Cavers are always a fun day get-away.

Frederick County is home to founding father of our country, George Washington and founding mother of country music, Patsy Cline. There are ten different locations of the Patsy Cline Self-guided Tour in Frederick.

Usually held the first few days in May, each spring Frederick County is host to over 250,000 visitors and residents who witness the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival.

Getting Around:

U.S. Route 15 is accessible taking you to the border of West Virginia or right into Washington, D.C. I-81 runs right down the middle of Frederick County, VA.

Airports:

Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport:  < 30 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport: < 64 miles
Washington County Regional Airport:  < 69 miles

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Frederick County (MD)

Frederick County, MD

Frederick County is located in Western Maryland and is part of the Washington-Baltimore Metropolitan Area. It is home to the President’s retreat at Camp David.

Downtown Historic Frederick provides the backdrop for a bustling business community. Residents go local to support a number of retail and boutique stores and restaurants. The food is something to write home about, like Bryan Voltaggio’s restaurant Volt.

The agricultural influences in Frederick County are clearly evident in the numerous farmers markets and CSAs that are open to the public. South Mountain Creamery supplies the region with its bovine delights.

Frederick County is in the midst of change with many new developments. Strict zoning laws ensure that the historic appeal of the county’s downtown area is not lost to the future. Also to note, there are concerts in the park during the summer and the annual festival, In the Streets, always brings out a good crowd.

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Fredericksburg City

Fredericksburg, VA

Fredericksburg City is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia that offers a unique blend of the past and present. Whether you’re a history buff, a food lover, or an outdoor enthusiast, Fredericksburg has something to offer each and every person.

In the mood to walk the footsteps of Civil War Generals, come visit one of the many battlefields Fredericksburg has to offer.  With its position halfway between the capitals of the Union and Confederacy, you’ll have your pick of Civil War Sites to discover history. If all that walking worked up a thirst, walk your way to your final stop at the historic family-owned A. Smith Bowman Distillery or kick your feet up and jump aboard the Trolley Tours of Fredericksburg to the many surrounding vineyards for a natural setting in which to relax.

Fredericksburg is known not only known for its historical battlegrounds; but also for its rolling hills, which provide the perfect game for golf enthusiasts.  Fredericksburg is home to numerous top-rated golf courses that include the challenging Gauntlet Golf Club, Augustine Golf Club, Lee’s Hill Golfer’s clubs, and scenic Meadows Farm Golf Course.  

Not to worry if golf isn’t your game of choice, Fredericksburg offers many other ways to enjoy the wild outdoors.  Boat, swim, bike, kayak, and hike at the popular Lake Anna State Park.  Then, at the end of your long day, picnic in the park with friends and family or enjoy an evening fishing in the Rappahannock and Rapidan Rivers.

If you are looking for dinner and a night out, make your way downtown.  As a prominent port in Virginia during the colonial era, historic downtown Fredericksburg is no stranger to shopping, dining and entertaining.  With specialty boutiques, antiques, shops and art galleries, over 600 dining establishments and live entertainment venues, Fredericksburg has something for everyone.  

For those evenings where you may have overindulged at one of Fredericksburg’s charming restaurants, make your way to one of the many trails and pathways Fredericksburg has to offer for exercise and fresh air.  For a more scenic route, find yourself on Canal Path/Heritage trail for a paved 3.1 miles along the canal and river.  If you’re looking for something a little more challenging, look no further than the Motts Run Reservoir, an 860 acre park that has over 4.5 miles of hiking trails and contains the Motts Run Orienteering Course; consisting of eight different courses, providing great exercise and fun for the entire family.  As always, don’t forget to include the entire family when it comes to exercising.  Fredericksburg offers a special fenced-in Fredericksburg Dog Park that is available to city residents and their pets only. It’s great place for your pet to play and a perfect place to meet your new neighbors!

Getting Around:

Located near the Rappahannock River and neighboring Spotsylvania County; it is 47 miles south of Washington, DC and 53 miles north of Richmond.  With the convenience of I-95 running through the middle of Fredericksburg, residents are able to commute to nearby Fairfax, Prince William and Arlington counties.   Whether it’s by car, bus, or rail, Fredericksburg offers various methods of transportation such as the Virginia Railway Express to get to Washington, D.C., or Amtrak for long distance destinations.  Staying in the area for the day? Make sure to view the Fredericksburg area calendar!  Filled with music, arts, family fun and special events, you and your family are sure to find a new way to celebrate and mingle with your new community!

Airports:

Shannon Airport:  < 5 miles
Flying T Farm Airport:  < 15 miles
Culpeper County Airport:  < 43 miles
Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport: < 52 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport: < 72 miles

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Friendship Heights

Sitting right on the border of Washington D.C. and Maryland, Friendship Heights offers a part of the city that has both an urban and suburban advantages. Friendship Heights boasts different housing options and architectural styles, a walkable neighborhood, easy Metro access thanks to the Red Line and lots of upscale shopping for residents. Friendship Heights is bounded by River Road to the southwest, Willard Avenue and Western Avenue to the north, 41st Street and Reno Road to the east and Chesapeake Street to the South and River Road to the southwest. The neighborhood is a mix of new and long-time residents who love the D.C. city life and the advantages of suburban shopping and activities.

Quality of Life:

Residents can choose from a mix of condos, townhomes, row houses and single-family homes as well as apartment buildings and high rise developments. There is definitely a quiet suburban feel to some streets in Friendship Heights. Condos are found closer to the Red Line for people who appreciate a more urban downtown lifestyle. Friendship Heights appeals to young families who want to stay in the District and offers something for everyone. Friendship Heights is famous for its fun shopping locations! Shoppers can choose from malls to small boutiques and enjoy restaurants, too.

Getting Around:

It’s easy getting around Friendship Heights thanks to the Friendship Heights Red Line Metro Station. Residents appreciate the ease of walking to nearby stores, entertainment, and restaurants, too. From young families that don’t want to move out of the District, to singles and retired couples, Friendship Heights has a lot of everything to offer!

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Georgetown

Georgetown is located in Northwest D.C. Glover Park lies to the north, Foggy Bottom to the east.  Rosslyn rests right over the Key Bridge. The community shares an intimate relationship with the Potomac River and, at over 300 years old, stands as a testament to America’s storied past.

Georgetown was founded in 1751 as part of the Province of Maryland. The first settler in was an English fur trader named Henry Fleet, who arrived in the 1630s. Georgetown was the farthest point up the Potomac River that ocean faring ships could navigate. Georgetown University was established in 1789 and was home to tobacco warehouses and, in the late 1800s, industrial developments. Georgetown has retained much of its natural charm and many of the homes have been preserved or updated to meet standards set by the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts.

Quality of Life:

Georgetown is as fashionable of a place to live as it gets. Classic townhomes and stately federal, colonial and contemporary homes line quiet, narrow streets. It has been home to a number of Capitol luminaries such as John F. Kennedy, Bob Woodward, Madeleine Albright and John Kerry.

The intersection of M Street and Wisconsin Avenue is a bustling center for commerce, dining and nightlife. There are ample bars, restaurants and clubs throughout Georgetown. Numerous other boutiques can be found while wandering the streets off M Street and Wisconsin Avenue. Georgetown’s Waterfront Park is a scenic walk. The C&O Canal is well maintained by the National Park Service and is excellent for running or biking. The attractions of DuPont Circle and K Street are minutes away and the Kennedy Center will be sure to delight any audience.

Getting Around:

M Street and Wisconsin are the major arteries that run through Georgetown. A 15-minute walk will get residents to the Foggy Bottom-GWU metro station, which is serviced by the Blue and Orange lines. Metro and Circulator buses frequent the community. It is only a short drive to Rosslyn. Easy access to the G.W. Parkway.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Glover Park

Glover Park is a primarily residential area located off Wisconsin Avenue a half mile north of Georgetown and west of the U.S. Naval Observatory. Development of Glover Park expanded in the mid-late 1920s with the construction of row houses, apartment buildings and a commercial strip along Wisconsin Avenue toward Georgetown. Glover Park is named after Charles Carroll Glover (proper pronunciation “Gluh-ver”), who was an influential 19th-20th century D.C. banker and philanthropist. He is credited with preserving Rock Creek Park and is considered the “father” of the National Zoo.

Quality of Life:

Once off the main commercial area along Wisconsin Avenue, Glover Park is a quiet front-porch neighborhood characterized by apartments and row houses. The only disturbance may be the sounding of colors from the Naval Observatory or the bells from the National Cathedral.

Glover Park is an active neighborhood and its residents enjoy participating in community affairs. Each year, the annual Glover Park Day celebration hosts live music, local fare and activities for all. Glover Park is walking distance to many restaurants and also close to the action in Georgetown and Tenleytown. Nearby Guy Mason Park and Recreation Center is equipped with a playground, baseball/softball field, basketball courts and more.

Getting Around:

Glover Park, like Georgetown, is not serviced by a metro station, but is frequented by several bus lines that bring residents to Georgetown, Downtown, D.C. and Maryland. It is a short drive or walk to the Tenleytown Metro, which is on the Red Line. 

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Howard County

Howard County, MD

Howard County is located in central Maryland between Baltimore and Washington D.C. It is part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area and is adjacent to Anne Arundel County, Frederick County, Montgomery County and Prince George’s County.

Howard County’s friendly business climate provides the foothold for a diverse business base, which incorporates a wide range of industries including high technology, telecommunications and biotechnology.

Howard County boasts a rich agrarian history. Today, Howard County residents enjoy a locale that successfully blends the past and the present as well as rural and urban elements. There are numerous opportunities to enjoy the close proximity of Baltimore and Washington, D.C., and an abundance of outdoor offerings as well.

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K Street

In many respects, the K Street community is really downtown Washington. Almost entirely commercial in nature, it encompasses some of the most important buildings in the Executive Branch, including the White House and the Treasury Department.  There are three historic parks that help define the area, Lafayette Square directly to the north of the White House, McPherson Square, slightly to the northeast, and Farragut Square on the northwest corner.

Quality of Life:

If the energy surrounding our nation’s affairs suit your tastes, this is the place to be.  Major national and international events tend to bring folks to Lafayette Park to protest or praise, and when the quadrennial Inaugural Parade ends in your backyard you know you’re in the middle of the seat of power.  High-end restaurants, retail and office space dominate the non-federal landscape.

Getting Around:

Pennsylvania Avenue used to be the main traffic thoroughfare, but security concerns shut down the area in front of the White House years ago – it is now a wide open pedestrian plaza.  There are three Metro stations: McPherson Square, Farragut West and Metro Center.  And for a select few – like the President of the United States – a helicopter landing in the back yard is the preferred mode of travel.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  <5 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 27 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 32 miles

And for the President, Andrews Air Force Base: 5 minutes by air

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Kalorama/Kalorama Triangle

Kalorama and Kalorama Triangle are both located in Northwest, D.C. These communities lie just south of Woodley Park, on the opposite side of Rock Creek Park. Adams Morgan and DuPont Circle border Kalorama and Kalorama Triangle.

The area was a predominantly rural setting through most of the 18th and 19th centuries. Much of this land was owned as a single property under Gustavus Scott, a commissioner of D.C. Joel Barlow, an American poet and diplomat, purchased the property in 1807 and chose to rename it “Kalorama,” which translates to “beautiful view” in Greek. Under orders from the U.S. Congress, Kalorama was subdivided and parceled in the late 1890s to accommodate the growing Federal City.

Quality of Life:

Kalorama and Kalorama Triangle offer a village like atmosphere within a larger metropolitan area. Real estate options vary, from freestanding and attached homes, and apartments and condominiums. There are ample amenities nearby in Adams Morgan

The communities feature clean streets and well-kept parks. Rock Creek Park is easily accessible and is a wonderful outlet for action pursuits. Visitors and inhabitants alike should take note of the number of embassy buildings that can be found here. The National Zoo is only a short walk away. The treasures of DuPont Circle dining and nightlife lie just to the south.

Getting Around:

Kalorama and Kalorama Triangle are accessible from the DuPont Circle and Woodley Park Metro stations, as well as various bus lines. Arrive by car via Connecticut Avenue, Columbia Road and Massachusetts Avenue.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Kent

Kent is located in Northwest D.C., along the Potomac River, just over the D.C-Maryland boundary line.

Quality of Life:

Residential neighborhood close to Sibley Hospital; Kent offers quiet streets outside of the busy city. It is a great access point to the Potomac and the Capital Crescent Trail.

Getting Around:

Kent is a commuter, car-oriented neighborhood. Metro bus service runs along MacArthur Boulevard. Major thoroughfares also include Loughboro Road and Chain Bridge Road.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Langdon

Langdon is known as D.C.’s neighborhood “quiet corner”. Langdon is located in the northeast about a mile from the District’s northeast border. Langdon’s borders are New York Avenue to the south, Montana Avenue to the southwest, Rhode Island Avenue to the northwest, South Dakota Avenue to the northeast and Bladensburg Road to the southeast. Residents will find unique single-family homes, cute bungalows, and Cape Cod's, where neighbors enjoy the quiet, green spaces from their large lots, backyards and porches. Langdon also offers apartments, public housing, a retirement home and an industrial business area.

Quality of Life:

The Langdon Park Community Center provides excellent recreation opportunities thanks to the hiking trails, swimming pool, basketball and tennis courts, along with a nice dog and skate parks. There is a public library branch in Langdon. Langdon has a community garden and a popular weekly Farmers Market. Langdon’s industrial area in the south and waste management site are looking to improve their appearance and integration into Langdon’s plan to increase new businesses with mixed-use development around Rhode Island Avenue.

Getting Around:

Langdon is conveniently located near the neighborhoods of Brookland, Bloomingdale, Mount Rainier and Hyattsville. The H Street corridor is located two miles to the south. Langdon’s nightspots and commuters generate traffic between Rhode Island and New York Avenue (Route 50). Langdon is a good option for someone needing to access nearby Central D.C., I-295, and the Beltway. Several bus lines will take you through the Langdon neighborhood, and if you don’t have a car the Red Line Metro station is a twenty-minute walk. There is good access to the Metrobus routes to Rhode Island Avenue and Bladensburg Road corridors.

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LeDroit Park

LeDroit Park is located in Northwest D.C. near Howard University. The community was developed by Amzi Barber and Andrew Langdon in 1873. Together, the two men worked to transform rural tracts of land into a lively village-like neighborhood.

Many of the homes here were constructed in the late 1870s under the supervision of architect James McGill. Many resources were also directed towards substantial landscaping projects. The result was an aesthetically pleasing community that featured stately Victorian mansions, houses and row houses. In the 1940s LeDroit Park became a focal point for prominent African Americans and later, the Civil Rights Movement.

Quality of Life:

LeDroit Park exudes the ethos of a small town suburb. Many of the community’s original homes are still standing. Although it is primarily residential, there is a commercial area only a short walk away at Rhode Island Avenue and First Avenue, where you can stop by Bloomingdale’s Farmers Market, which is held every Sunday from 10-2. The Big Bear Café is another favorite also located in the nearby neighborhood of Bloomingdale.

Getting Around:

LeDroit Park is only a half-mile from both Shaw-Howard University station (Green and Yellow lines) and New York Avenue station (Red line). Metro bus service is also reliable. Outside of longer trips, LeDroit Park residents are within walking distance to numerous amenities, services and restaurants. Rhode Island Avenue and Florida Avenue are easily accessible for city drivers.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Logan Circle

During the Civil War, Logan Circle was the site of Camp Barker, whose barracks had been converted into a refugee camp for newly freed slaves from Maryland and Virginia. The streetcar arrived in the 1870s and urban developments ensued, which resulted in a neighborhood that followed the original Washington city plan.

For some time the area was referred to as Iowa Circle until Congress renamed it in 1930 after John A. Logan, commander of the army of Tennessee during the Civil War. 14th Street became the main shopping and commercial area in Logan Circle during the 20th Century and remains that way today.

Quality of Life:

Logan Circle has retained its 200 year old charm, as many of the original Victorian row houses remain along the streets of Logan Circle. It is a popular arts and retail destination with the renovated Studio Theater and plenty of local shops with unique finds. This continues through its close proximity to the U Street Corridor with more retail and dining options that are just a short walk away.

Transportation:

Although there is not a designated Logan Circle Metro station, most residents don’t even notice because it is so close to several Metro accessible neighborhoods including DuPont Circle, Shaw-Howard University, and U Street-Cardozo. Several Metrobus and Circulator bus options throughout Logan Circle and the surrounding neighborhoods. Major thoroughfares include Rhode Island Avenue, P Street and 13th Street.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Loudoun County

Like other suburbs of Washington, D.C., Loudoun County has experienced a huge population boom over the past thirty years. Nestled in eastern Northern Virginia approximately twenty five miles from the District, it shares a border with the Shenandoah River to the east, the Potomac River to the North, Washington Dulles International Airport to the west and Fairfax County to the south. Loudoun County successfully combines open spaces for rural outdoor activities, quiet suburbs, and a competitive global business environment situated next to Washington Dulles International Airport and Washington, D.C.

Quality of Life:

Loudoun County is a family oriented location. The area’s qualified workforce draws from all over the Washington, D.C. area. If you are interested in learning more about the Civil War, shopping for antiques, horseback riding and other equestrian activities and pursuing an active outdoor lifestyle, you will love living here. Loudoun County is officially recognized on the east coast as DC Wine Country with over forty wineries to explore. Over twenty local craft breweries can be found on the LoCo Ale Trail, with wonderful restaurants everywhere. Local artists are celebrated here on the Artisan Trail where you will find locally made food, products and appreciate the culture of the area. Regional parks offer every possible way to enjoy water sports. Relaxing and popular getaway destinations include historic Middleburg and Leesburg for shopping, spas, dining and just enjoying the beauty of country life.

Getting Around:

When the Dulles Corridor Metrorail Silver Line Project (currently in Phase 2) is complete, residents will have access from Ashburn to Dulles Airport, ending in Herndon, Virginia. Access to vanpools, commuter busses, and carpools are available from IShare66. Loudoun County Transit provides rush hour service between park and ride lots to the Orange and Silver lines. County bus service provides fixed routes throughout the county during the week and some routes on Saturday.

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Manor Park

Manor Park is a fairly small neighborhood in the upper northeast quadrant of Washington, D.C., with the public Manor Park itself at its center; Fort Slocum Park is also nearby.  Close to the Maryland/DC line, Manor Park is bounded by Takoma Park to the north, Fort Totten to the south and Brightwood to the west. The area is almost entirely residential in nature.  As is true with much of northeast DC, the homes are primarily row homes or townhouses built in the 1940s and 1950s.

Quality of Life:

Despite its urban surroundings, many will find Manor Park to have a suburban feel, particularly with the two public parks.  There are a handful of local service businesses, but in general Manor Park is a quiet neighborhood.

Getting Around:

Kansas and New Hampshire Avenues run through the middle of Manor Park, and the Takoma Metrorail station is at the northern tip of the community.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 11 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 31 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 32 miles

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Michigan Park

The Michigan Park neighborhood is in the northeast quadrant of the District, and is bounded by Brookland to the west, Manor Park to the north, and Hyattsville, Maryland to the east.

Quality of Life:

This is a neighborhood of tree-lined streets and tidy single-family detached homes, duplexes and row houses.  Part of the Fort Circle Parks National Recreation Trails runs through the northern edge of Michigan Park.  This almost 8-mile long series of trails connects the remains of eight Civil-War era defense structures and provides beautiful, green open space in this urban community.

Getting Around:

Busy South Dakota and Eastern Avenues define the western and eastern edges of Michigan Park and the Fort Totten Metro station is a nearby.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 31 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 28 miles

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Montgomery County

From its first land grant in 1688 to the present day high technology centers, Montgomery County has played a vital role in the development of this country. It has evolved from a region of agricultural communities into a major force of growth and stability in the Washington, D.C. Metropolitan Area.

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Mount Pleasant

Charles Calvert, the 5th Lord of Baltimore gave the land that is now Mount Pleasant to James Holmstead in 1727. Holmstead's son inherited the land in 1750, naming it Pleasant Plains. At this point Mount Pleasant was still an independent entity. When Congress created the District, Pleasant Plains became part of Washington County and the Holmstead family eventually sold the land to the government.

Samuel P. Brown purchased 73 acres between 14th and 17th Streets during the Civil War to build a home and a wartime hospital. He renamed the area Mount Pleasant Village. Further developments of the neighborhood did not come until 1900 when the streetcar line opened, which led to the creation of a community of row houses surrounded by trees and gardens.

Mount Pleasant was the site of numerous construction projects from 1900 to 1925. The Mount Pleasant Library, built with funds donated by Andrew Carnegie in 1925, is still in use today.

Quality of Life:

Mount Pleasant borders Rock Creek Park, which gives residents a sylvan experience. The community features beautiful row houses and apartment buildings. On the other side of Mount Pleasant is Columbia Heights, which is often considered to be the retail portion of Mount Pleasant. They are in fact, two separate communities. Mount Pleasant residents are actively engaged in civic affairs. There is a weekly farmers market on Saturdays from May to November. Be sure to take advantage of the community’s prime location next to the National Zoo.

Getting Around:

Several bus lines service the Mount Pleasant community. The Columbia Heights Metro station is a short walk or bike ride away. Major thoroughfares include 16th Street, Beach Drive and Columbia Road.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Mount Vernon Sq/Convention Center

Mt. Vernon Square/Convention Center is an ambiguous label used to describe the developments north of Chinatown and Gallery Place. In contemporary contexts, it is the site of the Washington, D.C. Convention Center, which hosts a variety of expositions throughout the year. Its history mirrors that of the other downtown communities. The area is home to a number of historic buildings including a Carnegie Library, which was built in 1903. Today, this building serves as the headquarters for the Historical Society of Washington, D.C.

Quality of Life:

Mt. Vernon Square is a mixed-use neighborhood that is centered around the convention center.  Visitors to this area will find a fine selection of apartments, condos and town homes. There are plenty of amenities nearby and Metro access makes living here convenient.

Getting Around:

The Green and Yellow Line metro can be picked up at the Mt. Vernon Square/7th Street Convention Center Metro station. Metro Bus service is also reliable. Major arteries include M Street, 7th Street, New York Avenue and Massachusetts Avenue.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Navy Yard

The D.C. Navy Yard was instituted in 1799 and was the nation’s largest shipbuilding facility at the time. The Navy Yard played a vital role in the development of the surrounding area throughout the 19th century. The Wharf was the place to find jobs as new workers were always needed to serve both the shipyard and the busy commercial district surrounding the Navy Yard.

The Navy Yard reached peak production in the 1940s. After WWII, the Navy Yard opted to consolidate its campus, as the sheer size was no longer necessary for the post-WWII society.

Quality of Life:

Since the height of the Navy Yard, it has since developed in other capacities. Today, the Navy Yard is most famously known as the home of the Washington National’s. The stadium has spurred further development around the area to serve the traffic that it brings to the neighborhood.

Growth has also been seen with the addition of the U.S. Department of Transportation office complex, furthering the need for restaurant and retail options for the employees and residents.

Getting Around:

Residents can pick up the Green Line Metro Rail at the Navy Yard station. The Green Line is close to Gallery Place-Chinatown station where transfers can be made can to both the Yellow and Red Line trains. As is the case with most neighborhoods in D.C., several bus lines frequent D.C.’s Navy Yard. For those driving, there is easy access to I-295 and I-395.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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North Cleveland Park

Located just northwest of Cleveland Park, North Cleveland Park is known for being on the urban-suburban edge of the District. Convenient to popular grocery stores, restaurants, a community garden and shops along Connecticut and Wisconsin Avenues, residents rave about where they live. President Grover Cleveland bought his house south of Rosedale in Cleveland Park during his first term in office. Both areas showcase all the popular architectural styles of homes that were popular in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Residents and buyers today appreciate the sturdy construction and beautiful original features found in many homes in North Cleveland Park. The neighborhood is also called Van Ness, since it is located next to the Van Ness-UDC Metro station.

Quality of Life:

North Cleveland Park residents enjoy both living in a green and quiet D.C. neighborhood, but still want to be close to everything and walk to shops usually within 15 minutes. The beautiful tree-lined streets of North Cleveland Park really appeal to residents and set it apart from other neighborhoods. It is home to and several embassies and schools including the University of the District of Columbia, Van Ness campus, and several private schools within walking distance.

Getting Around:

Some boundaries in North Cleveland Park can differ, but generally Albemarle Street NW to the north, Connecticut Avenue and the University of the District of Columbia to the east, Tilden and Upton streets NW to the south, and Wisconsin Avenue to the west. The neighborhood is served by the Tenleytown-AU and Van Ness-UDC Metro stations on the Red Line plus several Metrobus lines.

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Old City

In the 1790s, Notley Young acquired a large parcel of land from several different landowners and named it Youngsborough. Shortly after he gave the land to the Federal government in exchange for a promise that Congress would re-divide up the land and return half the lots to the original landowners.

When D.C. became the nation’s capital, a grid system was formed laying out a northern border of Boundary Street (now Florida Avenue) for the city limits. The Old City area remained underdeveloped farmland until the construction of the Washington Branch of the B&O Railroad. This construction helped create a neighborhood with wood and coal yards to serve the railroad system. The growth of jobs spurred the construction of houses for the employees shortly thereafter.

The streetcar also contributed to the growth in Old City around the H Street Corridor, as it was the eastern terminus of the line. H Street became populated with commercial lots turning it into one of the most important shopping spots in Washington, D.C.

Quality of Life:

The community is comprised of mostly row houses. Life in Old City is centered around the H Street corridor, which boasts a variety of eclectic restaurants and entertaining nightlife. Several theaters have recently been constructed.

Getting Around:

Old City does not have a dedicated Metro station. However, the Red Line at Union Station is nearby. There is Metro Bus service to and from the Chinatown/Gallery Place Metro station.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Oxon Hill

Located one-half mile outside the Capital Beltway and just twenty minutes from Washington, D.C., Oxon Hill is an unincorporated region that is bordered by the Potomac River to the west, the District to the north, Temple Hills to the east and National Harbor to the south. Oxon Hill is home to National Harbor, the premier 350-acre waterfront destination for hotels, shopping, dining, business conferences and year-round special events. The Capital Wheel is a landmark, too, where riders will see views of the District, Virginia and the Potomac Oxon Hill Manor, a mansion built in 1929 for diplomat Sumner Welles, takes us back in time with beautiful views of the Potomac River, classic architecture and is a popular location for special events.

Quality of Life:

The Henson Creek Trail provides outdoor enthusiasts with almost six miles of beautiful trails for biking, in-line skating, hiking, and jogging plus horseback riding on grass trails along Henson Creek through neighborhoods and parks. The three and a half mile Woodrow Wilson Bridge Trail links Alexandria, Virginia to Oxon Hill and provides pedestrians and cyclists with incredible views as they cross the Potomac River with viewing scopes and barriers to keep noise and traffic out as they enjoy the views of National Harbor and Alexandria, where you can continue on the Mount Vernon Trail in Virginia. The Marlow Heights Community Center and Glassmanor Community Center provide residents with more recreational opportunities with playgrounds, picnic areas, tennis courts, baseball and football fields plus community rooms and gyms.

Getting Around:

Due to the phenomenal growth and demand for public transportation to National Harbor, commuters can use the Metrobus from Alexandria’s Huntington Metro station on the Yellow Line and King Street-Old Town Metro station on the Yellow and Blue lines, stopping at the Oxon Hill Park-and-Ride and the MGM National Harbor. The nearest Metro station is Huntington across the Woodrow Wilson Bridge, in Virginia. In Maryland, the Southern Avenue Metro is seven miles from Oxon Hill on the Green Line. From Oxon Hill, you can easily get to Washington D. C. with good access to I-295 and I-95/495.

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Palisades/Berkley

The Palisades community was developed in 1893 when the Palisades Improvement Company decided to capitalize on the recent addition of the new D.C. streetcar line running from Georgetown to Glen Echo. The construction of large homes and estates remained in vogue even after the streetcar line shut down in 1961. Post-war era developers took advantage of the flourishing neighborhood, even without the streetcar, and continued to build large estates for interested Washingtonians.

Quality of Life:

The Palisades is a predominantly residential community. It offers small town character a short distance from the big city. There are plenty of outdoor activities to keep residents busy. Fletcher’s Cove allows residents to go kayaking, canoeing and fishing on the Potomac River. Great hiking trails like the Capital Crescent Trail and the C&O Towpath can also be found off the banks of the river.

Getting Around:

The closest metro station is at the American University/Tenleytown Metro stop. There are several bus lines that run on Loughboro Road. Having a car is helpful in getting around. Loughboro Road turns into Nebraska Avenue. Canal Road and MacArthur Boulevard run towards Georgetown. Cross the Potomac at Chain Bridge to get to McLean or Arlington.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles 

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Penn Quarter

The Penn Quarter neighborhood is often considered a part of the Downtown, D.C. area. Penn Quarter’s growth stemmed from the Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation (PADC) that called for a mixed-use neighborhood, looking beyond a residential focus. The PADC incorporated residences, offices, cultural venues, theater, retail, hotels and restaurants to make the neighborhood as dynamic as possible. In addition new parks and plazas were created including Pershing Park, Freedom Plaza and the Navy Memorial. The Verizon Center, which opened in 1997, has contributed to the robust growth of Penn Quarter.

Quality of Life:

The living experience in Penn Quarter is one marked by convenience. It is defined by high-rise apartment and condominiums. Penn Quarter is a neighborhood that offers everything one could possibly need. Numerous museums, theaters, restaurants, bars and art galleries are all within walking distance. Despite the community’s distinctly urban setting, the FRESHFARM Market ensures that residents have access to a supply of locally grown produce.

Getting Around:

Since Penn Quarter is easily accessible in the Downtown area, the transportation options are endless. Four Metro stations serve Penn Quarter including Archives-Navy Memorial-Penn Quarter, Metro Center, Judiciary Square and Gallery Place-Chinatown. In addition, several Metrobus routes run throughout, including the $1 Circulator.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Petworth

Petworth was originally the site of two country estates in Washington County, D.C.: Petworth, the 204-acre estate of Colonel John Taylor, and the Marshall Brown Estate, the 183-acre estate that was later acquired by the Taylor family.

The original city plan did not incorporate the estates. They were purchased in the 1880s by real-estate investment partnerships and were then adjusted to the area development. The development continued when the Georgia Avenue streetcar line to Silver Spring was established, which caused the neighborhood to expand quickly. Cafritz Buildings and DJ Dunigan Company constructed brick row houses throughout the neighborhood during the 1920s and 30s to complete the development boom.

Quality of Life:

Petworth is primarily a residential area with a mix of town houses and single-family homes. Petworth was expected to develop more of a commercial neighborhood with the addition of a Metro station in 1999; however, it has retained the essence of residential neighborhood. Nearby Columbia Heights is ideal for shopping and dining.

Getting Around:

The Georgia Avenue-Petworth Metro station offers both Green and Yellow Lines service Metro Bus service run to Silver Spring, Mount Pleasant and Rhode Island Avenue.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Prince Georges County

Prince George’s County is located in the heart of the Baltimore/Washington corridor. It borders Montgomery County and the District of Columbia. Prince George’s County was established in 1696, includes some 500 square miles of land and is home to a number of commercial businesses and residential neighborhoods. A considerable portion of the County’s western boundary brushes up against the Potomac River.

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Prince William County

Prince William County extends from the banks of the Potomac all the way to Manassas in the west.  It is bound on the north by Fairfax County and Loudoun County and to the south by Stafford County. The area was settled in 1731 and was a predominantly rural environment, with gristmills and tobacco warehouses. During the Civil War, the community of Manassas was the site of several historic battles, which are commemorated today by the National Park Service.

Today the communities of Prince William County are “bedroom communities” of Washington, D.C. It is a place with deep ties to America’s colonial past and wonderful place to call home.

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Rappahannock County

Rappahannock County, VA

Welcome to Rappahannock County! Founded in 1833, Rappahannock County is in the northern portion of the Commonwealth of Virginia.  Taking its name from the Rappahannock River, which separates it from Fauquier County, Rappahannock County is bounded on the southeast by Culpeper County and on the southwest by Madison County. Rappahannock County is home to five villages and the Town of Washington, all of which provide historical value.
 
The villages of Rappahannock County, historically ran as frontier posts and crossroads, are still agriculturally based with the surrounding villages providing basic services for the farms.  Today, the five villages of Amissville, Chester Gap, Flint Hill, Sperryville, and Woodville represent a focal point for county residents providing shops, entertainment and events.
 
Celebrate your inner artist and discover the many antique, artisan and photography galleries that Rappahannock County has to offer.  Rappahannock County not only attracts art lovers due its numerous galleries, but hikers and outdoors enthusiasts alike.  With the Rappahannock River running approximately 195 miles in length, you will find plenty of opportunities to experience this river that is rich in Virginia history.  Favored by canoeists, the river is renowned primarily for its smallmouth bass fishing and its sweet and smooth flavored oysters. Don’t believe us? Make sure to check out the Rappahannock Oyster Company to see for yourself!
 
Not to worry if canoeing is not for you! With the Blue Ridge Mountains occupying much of the western portion of the county, you will have plenty of other activities to choose from. Encompassing part of the Blue Ridge Mountains is the Shenandoah Park.  With nearly 40% of the land designated as wilderness and Nationally protected, the Shenandoah offers plenty of opportunities for backcountry camping, hiking, and weekend getaways to campgrounds and cabins.
 
If your idea of being outdoors means sitting outside with a glass of wine, not to worry! Rappahannock County is home to several vineyards and distilleries that offer a different kind of outdoor experience. Let everyone else hike the famous “Old Rag,” and take a tour of the “Little Washington Winery and Vineyards.”  With a glass in hand, you’ll be sure to get your own kind of hike in for the day!
 
When it’s a little too chilly for camping, take the family for a ride down Skyline drive to view the beautiful changes in colors that Fall brings to the Blue Ridge Mountains. Then, once the only color on those mountains is white, pack up the family and make your way to Bryce Ski Resort for the day!

Getting Around:

For those days where you want to get of the Town of Washington and experience a bigger Washington, make your way east down Route 211 and find yourself in Washington, DC.  Located approximately 70 miles away, you can easily spend the day in the nation’s capitol and return home to the Town of Washington just in time to hear some bluegrass music with your local friends and family!

Airports:

Culpeper County Airport:  < 34 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 67 miles

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Shaw/U Street

The communities of Shaw and Howard University grew out of the freed slave encampments outside Washington City, then known as “Uptown.” The name didn’t shift to Shaw until the Urban Renewal era when the local Junior High School was named after Civil War Colonel Robert Gould Shaw.

Shaw thrived in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as the heart for African American intellectualism and culture. Notable residents include Duke Ellington, Langston Hughes and Malcolm X.

Quality of Life:

The Shaw and Howard University neighborhoods remain cultural centers today with the Lincoln Theater, Walter E. Washington Convention Center, and the 9:30 Club. Shaw real estate is defined by classic 19th century Victorian style row houses painted in a wide variety of colors. The neighborhood beyond the residential community is features plenty of local businesses and restaurants, including the famous Ben’s Chili Bowl on the U Street Corridor.

Transportation:

Shaw and Howard University are centrally located in D.C. The neighborhood is served by the Shaw-Howard University Metro station, but is also walking distance from the Mount Vernon Square station. There is reliable bus service on the 70 & 71 to Waterfront and Silver Spring, as well as the G2 bus connecting Georgetown University and Howard University. If you are a city driver, I-395 is close by.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Shenandoah County

Shenandoah County, VA

Shenandoah County is located southwest of Winchester, VA along both sides of Route 81. Shenandoah County offers a wide range of activities for residents and visitors alike, whether it’s skiing at Bryce Resort or taking a day to explore the Shenandoah Valley.

Quality of Life:

Shenandoah County has many small towns, with their own charm. Residents and visitors enjoy warm hospitality, local eateries and the artisan shopping. They also enjoy the many attractions the Shenandoah Valley has to offer such as, the Shenandoah Caverns, American Celebration on Parade and The Yellow Barn. The peaceful rivers and mountains make everyday an escape.

Shenandoah County offers a wide range of history as well. Civil War and settlement history are available at your fingertips, along with information from Woodstock, Edinburg and The Union Church.

Bryce Ski Resort is found in Shenandoah County. Residents and visitors enjoy seasonal outdoor recreation here.

Getting Around:

Shenandoah Valley Commuter Bus Service offers a weekday bus service for commuters. It includes Shenandoah County and Warren County and makes an easy commute to Northern Virginia Washington, D.C., Arlington County and Fairfax County. Major highways that are easily accessible include I-81, US 11 and US 48.

Airports:

Charlottesville-Albemarle Airport:  < 60 miles
Culpeper County Airport:  < 73 miles away
Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 112 miles

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Shepherd Park

Shepherd Park was named after Alexander Robey Shepherd, who was the governor of D.C. from 1874-1875. Shepherd moved to the neighborhood in 1868 and built a Second Empire-style Victorian home on the corner of what is now Geranium Street and 13th Street. He also owned a plant nursery in the District where he planted over 60,000 trees and plants; many of the wild flowers that he planted still pop up every year in the yards of Shepherd Park residents.  Because of his love for gardening, the streets within Shepherd Park are primarily named after flowers.

Quality of Life:

Shepherd Park is a residential neighborhood bounded by Eastern Avenue, Walter Reed Hospital, Georgia Avenue and 16th Street. The closeness to Rock Creek Park makes Shepherd Park a friendly shaded neighborhood with Colonial, Bungalow and Farmhouse style architecture.

Shepherd Park has one of the most active citizen’s associations in the District that has been around since the 1950s and continues to sponsor several community events each year.

Getting Around:

Shepherd Park is close to Silver Spring and Takoma Park Metro stations, both offering red line service. Metro buses also frequent the area in downtown Silver Spring and throughout the Shepherd Park community for easy access to the city.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Southeast

History and Geography:

Southeast has a rich cultural history. Residents live in close proximity to Capitol Hill, the Navy Yard, the Marine Barracks, the Anacostia River waterfront and historic Eastern Market

Quality of Life:

Recently, some areas of the Southeast quadrant of Washington, D.C. have undergone renewal. In areas close to the United States Capitol Building housing values have risen steadily. Nearby Nationals Park, the new home of Major League Baseball's Washington Nationals, opened in March 2008.

Getting Around:

Southeast Washington is accessible via the Blue and Orange Lines of the Washington Metro. Local Metro stations are Stadium/Armory and Potomac Ave.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 12 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 35 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 50 miles

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Southwest/Waterfront

As the name would suggest, the Southwest Waterfront is located in the District’s Southwest quadrant at the meeting point of the Potomac and Anacostia Rivers.

The Southwest Waterfront started as the home to Fort McNair, established in 1791. Following the Civil War, the Waterfront was hit hard, and one of the few things that held it together were incoming European immigrants and freed slaves who started their new lives there.

As the neighborhood struggled, Congress developed an urban renewal plan to build the Waterfront from ground up to promote economic development. Only a few establishments made it through the re-development period, including the Maine Avenue Fish Market, Wheat Row townhouses, the Thomas Law House and St. Dominic’s and Friendship Churches.

Quality of Life:

Since its re-development period in the 1950s, the Southwest Waterfront has grown significantly and is home to condominiums, apartment buildings and townhouses; all located within walking distance to the National Mall and Washington Nationals Stadium.

Getting Around:

Southwest Waterfront is conveniently located on the green line at the Waterfront – SEU Metro station. Some areas in the neighborhood also enjoy access to the L’Enfant Plaza Metro station offering Blue, Orange, Green and Yellow line service. Buses are also a popular way to get around with the 70, 71, A9, A42, P1, P2, V8, V9 and $1 Circulator buses serving this neighborhood.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Spotsylvania County

Spotsylvania County, VA

Spotsylvania County is located just south of Fredericksburg, VA and is halfway between Washington DC and Richmond, VA. It is still considered to be a part of the Greater Washington DC Metropolitan area as many of Spotsylvania’s residents commute north on I-95 or the VRE. There are number of parks located in Spotsylvania. Residents can take advantage of the boating and fishing opportunities at Lake Anna State Park. Richmond is a short drive south. The attractions in DC aren’t far either.

Quality of Life:

Spotsylvania County has many attractions around the area offered to both residents and visitors. Wineries, distilleries, breweries, golf, Belvedere Plantation, parks and Lake Anna are all amazing outdoor attractions offered. Spotsylvania is in a perfect location where it is easy to drive to Virginia beaches, the Blue Ridge Mountains, Kings Dominion, historic Williamsburg, Richmond and Washington, D.C. From bowling alleys to indoor recreation to pools to movie theaters there is something for everyone in Spotsylvania County, VA.

From fine dining to fast food Spotsylvania County will suit your needs with eateries. Plentiful in businesses, shops and stores for your convenience you will never get bored.

Getting Around:

Spotsylvania County offers a wide variety of transportation from airport transportation, to Amtrak to FRED Bus Stops to VRE. All easily accessible are I-95, US 1, Route 3 and US 17.

Airports:

Shannon Airport:  < 15 miles
Culpeper County Airport:  < 44 miles
Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport < 65 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 84 miles

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Spring Valley

Spring Valley is located in the Northwest quadrant of D.C. and sits between the 80 acres of the American University and the Wesley Theological Seminary on the east side and Sibley Memorial Hospital and the Dalecarlia Reservoir on the west side.

Spring Valley was a rural area for much of its beginning. The southern portion was acquired as part of the Whitehaven patent of 1689, and the Northern portion was part of the 1713 patent by Lord Baltimore to Thomas Addison and James Stoddert.

Development began in the early 1900’s with the W.C. and A.N. Miller Company who sought to take advantage of the natural contours of the area with a plan to call it the “Garden of Homes.”

Since its development, Spring Valley has been the home to several famous faces, including Richard Nixon, Lyndon B. Johnson, JFK, George HW Bush and Attorney General Eric Holder.

Quality of Life:

Within its boundaries, Spring Valley is a classic, friendly suburban neighborhood. Spring Valley is primarily residential with stately homes, most of colonial and Georgian style architecture, and tree-filled yards, making you forget that you are close to the city-limits. Yet despite being residential, there are still commercial areas located nearby in Tenleytown and Friendship Heights.

Getting Around:

Residents of Spring Valley have access to both Tenleytown and Friendship Heights red line Metro stations that are just a short bike ride or drive away.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Stafford County

Stafford County, VA

Stafford County is located north of Fredericksburg, VA, south of Dumfries VA and is part of the Washington DC Metropolitan Area. Many Stafford County residents commute to work in Washington DC on I-95, Route 1 and the VRE.

Quality of Life:

Stafford County has almost 350 years of great stories, history and natural beauty to discover. Doings such as historic architecture and archeology, fishing, impressionist art, golfing, boating and live theater are all at your fingertips in Stafford. Main attractions of Stafford include Ferry Farm, Chatham, White Oak Civil War Museum, Government Island and Riverside Dinner Theater, Aquia Landing Park on the Potomac River, and Falmouth Beach Park on the Rappahannock River.

Getting Around:

The Fredericksburg Regional Transit (FRED) lets residents from Stafford County access the Fredericksburg region while the VRE gives them access to Northern Virginia and Washington, D.C. Easy to access are I-95, Route 610, US 1 and US 17. Express Lanes begin and end in Stafford at Garrisonville (Rte 610)

Airports:

​Stafford Regional Airport < 5 miles
Flying T Farm Airport:  < 6 miles
Culpeper County Airport:  < 41 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 57 miles

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Takoma Park

Located east of the northernmost point in D.C., in the Northwest quadrant, Takoma, DC is a neighborhood that is often confused with its Maryland neighbor, Takoma Park.

The boundary confusion can be tracked back to the neighborhood's founder, Benjamin F. Gilbert, who decided to ignore jurisdictional lines and expand the neighborhood over the D.C. – Maryland border. The community of Takoma sprawled over 100 acres and included a small portion of the B&O Railroad. Takoma residents were originally reliant on the B&O railroad to move goods and travel.

Gilbert advertised Takoma as a neighborhood located above swampy Washington City, one that offered fresh air and clean water. This explains how Takoma received its name; Takoma originates from the Native American word meaning “high up, near heaven.”

Quality of Life:

Today the neighborhood of Takoma surrounds the red line Metro station with older Victorian and Sears’s style homes with large yards to complement the architecture. Within this primarily residential neighborhood is also a commercial district that is a short walk from of the center of town.

Takoma is an active neighborhood with plenty to do and several events throughout the year. Residents enjoy Takoma Park Day, the Annual Takoma Antique and Classic Car Show and the Takoma Park Street Festival. Residents also have a weekly farmers’ market for fresh local food, and have access to the Takoma Aquatic Center for recreational activities.

Takoma is also home to several restaurants, including the popular Roscoe’s Neapolitan Pizzeria, which almost everyone in Takoma knows is named after a rooster who once roamed the streets.

Getting Around:

Takoma’s primary form of public transportation is its red line Takoma Metro station. It also has frequent bus access if you are not looking for Metro service.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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Town of Upper Marlboro

The historic Town of the Upper Marlboro should not be confused with Greater Upper Marlboro. The Town of Upper Marlboro began in 1695 and has been the County Seat since 1721 when it was a tobacco shipping port. Downtown Main Street is home to the Prince George’s County Courthouse and the County Administration Building, and the Old Mill Road Office Park. There is definitely a “small-town” ambiance here that approximately 700 residents and over fifty business enjoy within a 0.4 square mile radius!

Quality of Life:

Small town living is what residents like about the Town of Upper Marlboro. “The Landings,” their quarterly local newsletter keeps everyone informed about community events for the residents from movies to voter forums. The Town of Upper Marlboro received a Sustainable Community designation in 2014 that continues to increase public and private investment. The Town also uses social media platforms to improve communication within the community. The Town of Upper Marlboro is located north of Maryland Route 4, and south of Largo, near the Show Place Arena and the Prince George’s Equestrian Center. The people residing in Upper Marlboro benefit from the close proximity to Washington D.C. due to the ease of access. The town also has multiple colonial tourist sites including old jails and courthouses. New developments include a large lake with walking paths, county office buildings, and numerous educational facilities.

Getting Around:

Residents access the District and surrounding communities using the Capital Beltway I-95/495, U.S. Route 301 and Maryland Route 4.

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Warren County

Warren County, VA

Warren County, VA is located almost due west of Washington, DC. Residents of Warren County are well situated, with easy access to wine and horse country, as well as the many offerings of the Shenandoah Valley. Warren County is part of the Greater Washington DC Metropolitan Area.

Quality of Life:

Warren County is considered the Canoe Capital of Virginia. This jewel of outdoor recreation offers activities in Shenandoah National Park, Skyline Drive, Shenandoah River State Park, and the George Washington National Forest.

Along with the extensive outdoor recreation opportunities, Warren County offers a quaint historic downtown area. The downtown offers restaurants within walking distance, art galleries and shopping. A walking tour is also available upon request.

Getting Around:

Major highways that are very accessible in Warren County are I-66, I-81, US 11 and US 340. Warren County also provides the FRAT, which is weekday transportation for the town of Front Royal. Page County Transit is weekday transportation between Luray and Front Royal.

Airports:

Culpeper County Airport:  < 54 miles
Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport:  < 56 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport:  < 65 miles

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Wesley Heights

Wesley Heights is located in D.C.’s Northwest quadrant, just south of Tenleytown. The community is bordered by New Mexico Avenue, Nebraska Avenue and Battery-Kemble Park.

Wesley Heights was rural until its development in the 1920s. The W.C. and A.N. Miller Company looked to incorporate the areas natural surroundings, much like they did with nearby Spring Valley and American University Park.

Quality of Life:

Today, Wesley Heights is a residential neighborhood full of wooded back yards and beautiful homes. It is conveniently located to Glover Park, Tenleytown and Friendship Heights offering restaurants, shopping and grocery stores.

The neighborhood is also home to the 0.8-mile Wesley Heights Park Trail that brings you from Battery-Kemble Park to Glover Archibald Park in Glover Park.

Getting Around:

The closest metro to Wesley Heights is the Tenleytown station on the Red line, which is easily accessible by foot, bike or car.

Airports:

Ronald Reagan National Airport:  < 10 miles
Washington-Dulles International Airport:  < 30 miles
Baltimore-Washington International Airport:  < 35 miles

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West End

The West End neighborhood is located in the Northwest quadrant. It is bounded by K Street, Rock Creek Park and George Washington University.

The name comes from the original city plan of Pierre L’Enfant where he placed this neighborhood at the westernmost portion of the city—prior to the District acquiring Georgetown.

Quality of Life:

The West End offers the benefits of city living, with a comfortable neighborhood feel. Its streets are filled with row houses, high-rises (never higher than 8 stories), local businesses and large corporations.

Residents enjoy all that the area has to offer with close proximity to Foggy Bottom, Georgetown, DuPont Circle, the downtown business district and the Kennedy Center.

Within the past 40 years, the West End has become a hot spot for restaurants, bars and entertainment. It is also home to the city’s only Trader Joe’s.

Getting Around:

West End is serviced by the Foggy Bottom—George Washington University Metro station offering the blue and orange line trains. There are also plenty Metrobus lines, as well as, the Circulator bus lines for just $1.

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Winchester City

Winchester County, VA

Winchester is an independent city and serves as the county seat of Frederick County, VA. Like its neighbors, Winchester is defined by its rural heritage. Winchester, VA enjoys the title of “Apple Capital.” Winchester is home to Shenandoah University and the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival. Residents of Winchester are well situated with easy access to the outdoor offerings of the Blue Ridge and Allegheny Mountains.

Quality of Life:

Winchester County has a vast array of activities to do. From history and museums to family fun, to outdoor recreation to shopping, arts and entertainment to a historic downtown there is something for everyone. 

Winchester is really known for the Shenandoah Apple Blossom Festival. Thousands of people come together to celebrate the apple blossoms. It has been going on since 1924 and is still a huge tradition. Parades, a carnival, dances, concerts, a 10K race, wine festivals and a golf tournament are the few of the 30 plus events.

Casual and fine dining is big in Winchester County. There is almost every kind of cuisine you could imagine. Along with the extensive dining options there is a magnificent nightlife. A draft house cinema, first Friday’s, wineries, grilles and lounges are only the start of the wonderful nightlife in Winchester County.

Getting Around:

Win Tran is a transit that operates regular routes throughout Winchester that takes passengers to local dining or shopping or anything else they need to access in the City of Winchester.  The Shenandoah Valley Commuter Bus offers weekday commutes to Northern Virginia, Washington, D.C., Arlington County and Fairfax County.  I-81 is very easy to access.

Airports:

Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport:  < 34 miles
Washington Dulles International Airport: < 68 miles
Cumberland Airport:  < 72 miles

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Woodley Park

Woodley Park is in the Northwest quadrant and is bordered by the National Zoo, Rock Creek Park, Calvert Street and Cleveland Avenue.

Real Estate mogul, Harry Wardman brought Woodley Park to life in the early 20th century. He developed the majority of the popular row houses in the neighborhood, and is also responsible for the Marriot Wardman Park Hotel, which he built in 1918.

One of the most famous estates in the neighborhood is “Woodley,” which was built by Philip Barton Key (Francis Scott Key’s uncle) in 1801. Today, it is the home of the Maret School.

Quality of Life:

Woodley Park is a popular D.C. neighborhood that houses apartment buildings, row houses and larger estates. It is conveniently located along Connecticut Avenue, which offers plenty of bars and restaurants. Woodley Park also has easy access to Cleveland Park, Adams Morgan or DuPont Circle.

The Woodley Park neighborhood is home to the National Zoo, which is free to everyone, and is known for bringing in plenty of tourists in the warmer months.

Getting Around:

Woodley Park has Red line Metro service at the Woodley Park Zoo – Adams Morgan station off of Connecticut Avenue and 24th Street. There are also several bus lines that run along Calvert Street and Connecticut Avenue, including the $1 Circulator.

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